Why claims escalate after major weather events

When severe storms strike, insurance builders usually attempt to protect damaged properties with tarpaulins. As wind and rain continue, tarps often rip, blow off, leak, or collapse, resulting in further property damage, additional stress and harm to occupants and owners, and escalating insurance claims. Labour costs also escalate as builders are called back again and again to replace failed tarps.

tarpaulin make safe use - stormseal solution

Do the job once and do it right with Stormseal

Stormseal is a strong polyethylene film that heat-shrinks to cover a damaged roof or wall, providing superior, lasting weather protection. Lightweight but strong, Stormseal is safer, easier, faster and cheaper to install than tarpaulins.

Unlike tarps, Stormseal stays put until permanent repairs are made, providing peace of mind to residents, property owners and their insurers.

With Stormseal:

  • insurance claims and labour costs are minimised
  • residents stay at home or return sooner
  • businesses and communities continue to function, and
  • policyholders are happier and more likely to renew.

Our solution is a complete system of online ordering, distribution, and accredited installer training. Our quality assurance processes cover manufacture through to installation.

To protect your policyholders and minimise your costs, partner with Stormseal.

FAQs for insurers

Stormseal is far more cost-effective than tarps. Tarps are cheaper to procure but they multiply claims costs manifold by causing further property damage when they frequently flap, tear, leak, collapse or flyaway. Labour costs ­are also greater for tarps because they require repeated replacement – 4 to 5 times on average, and up to 13 times – during the months it takes to process a damage claim.

Another cost of tarpaulins is loss of customer goodwill. Customers are traumatised as their home suffers further weather damage and the noise of flapping tarps keeps them awake at night. They experience extreme frustration when they have to telephone their insurer repeatedly to ask for failed tarps to be replaced. In contrast, Stormseal customers are very satisfied because they experience minimal disruption to their lives and have peace of mind knowing their home is secure.

Installers save time by using Stormseal. Tarp installation time includes the time taken to procure supplies of tarpaulin, sandbags and ropes for each job, as contractors generally don’t carry these on their trucks. Frequently, the first tarp purchased is the wrong size, which means a return trip to the hardware store.

Meanwhile, with a roll of film and complete toolbox already on their truck, the Stormseal installer has cut the film on-site to fit the job, and commenced attachment. One roll of Stormseal holds 400m2, or enough film for 10 average make-safe jobs. This equates to about two days’ work without stopping for further supplies.

When repeat visits to replace failed tarps are added to the account, it’s clear that as Stormseal resists all weather and stays put until permanent repairs can be made, it saves contractors vast amounts of time and cuts insurers’ costs dramatically.

We prioritise the safety of workers, residents and properties and discourage practices that increase risks and escalate costs. We’re proud of Stormseal’s excellent reputation and intend to maintain it. To ensure safety and quality, accountability is key. Our solution is a complete system of accredited installer training, specialist equipment, controlled ordering and performance tracking, so our quality assurance processes cover everything from manufacture to installation.

Only accredited installers can order Stormseal film and a toolkit containing everything needed for correct installation. Instead of relying on ropes, sandbags and ‘Hail Mary’s to hold a tarp in place (and when that fails, returning repeatedly to replace the tarp), Stormseal installers do the job once and do it right.

We inspect all Stormseal installations. Poor performance means loss of accreditation for the installer. By contrast, in Australia, when a tarpaulin (almost inevitably) performs poorly and requires replacement, the installer is rewarded with an additional make-safe fee from the insurer. Insurers pass these additional costs on to policy holders as higher premiums. Premiums also rise as claims escalate due to additional property damage caused by flapping, leaking tarps.

Storm victims who suffer under tarps and customers hit with higher premiums are likely to seek a better alternative, i.e. an insurer who uses Stormseal to provide a superior customer experience and keep costs down. Our insistence on safety and cost-effective high quality is positively transforming the insurance repairs industry.

Our installers mechanically fix all edges of the Stormseal film securely, often to the eaves of the structure. The risk of secondary damage on removal of the film is low, and if it occurs, the cost of replacing fascia boards or some roof tiles is negligible compared to the massive cost of internal damage to properties caused by flapping, leaking, flyaway tarpaulins.

Property damage is also caused by the sandbags and ropes used with tarps. Ropes are often tied to any available attachment point including gutter brackets, down-pipes, gas/water lines and fences. Under the load of wind or pooling rainwater on the tarp, the ropes’ attachment points are frequently damaged. Sandbags break down within six weeks of weather exposure and the sand escapes, filling gutters and valleys to create barriers that force water back into the roof cavity, causing more internal damage.

Stormseal minimises harm. Tarpaulins, ropes and sandbags frequently cause damage claims to multiply manifold. The superior choice is obvious.

No. We hold inventory and dispatch Stormseal film from our stock when an accredited installer places an order online through our customer portal. We have capacity to scale up film production to meet high demand following a severe weather event.

Yes. Accredited Stormseal installers are trained to complete a roof report before installing the film. If further assessment is required, contractors often cut inspection panels, in which case an accredited installer must remove and replace the Stormseal film. Similarly, insurers pay for tarps to be removed for roof inspections and replaced.